Setting up the Week

I stayed in the whole day Sunday. It rained on and off and like most tropical storms it brought power outages several times. But the surprise was they lasted less than 5 minutes at a time.

Today the sky is crystal clear and even though the temperature is lower than normal, I’m sure it’s a welcome change from the heat & humidity.

I decided to have lunch at the Clypso Restaurant on site but just outside of the hotel. It has nearly the same menu and prices as the restaurant I ate at on Saturday.

The Jamaican influence is dominant. From the music to the phrases they use, even though they profess a Creole dialectic, I hear more of Jamaica than any other source. Even those who were born and raised here, is Jamaican than from the British or Mexican influence., It is a pleasure to listen to them talk.

The food is well prepared and always displayed expertly. They don’t have access to things like fresh avocado unless it’s in season. Their menu is as varied as any in the US and slightly more reasonable.

I made a contact with a realtor who’s been here form more than 20 years. I’m guessing he’s British but we’ll find out later in the week.

It turns out everyone in the Ministry was off today today to attend a funeral.

I’d love to be able to talk with the business owners here. I’d like to know what they think and how they expect Belize will ever change if they never take a stand and step up to take the responsibility.

The lifestyle they’ve adopted in some ways is more perfect than the hustle and bustle style of the US. We have 65% of our children under the age of 12 who never see their parents during the week. Our children are being raised by strangers and the biggest stranger is the TV. Children are not making the heart-felt connectins with their families that is required to help then develop long-term relationshipss as adults.

So being in the moment and surviving day-by-day is not a bad life-style. What I find exception to is the lack of drive that might create resources for the next generation so they will be able to stay in Belize and create a multi-generation family.

The value is how life is lived day-by-day, no natter where.

About Sharyn

As founder of UBU I found my inspiration from my brother Tony who was a foster child, then adopted by my parents when he was five. After listening to his stories about the treatment he received while in the homes I began to think of what it was like for him as well as the thousands of other kids. I decided to start the school after Tony passed on in 2008. It is my tribute to him and all that he did for me. Of all the things I've done in my life, this is the one thing that truly makes me feel like I'm finally on the right path.
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